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AC 30 

1973/74 
Grad 



GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 




1973-1974 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



LIBRAKY 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



1973-74 Catalog 
The Graduate School 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



MAIN CAMPUS 

300 ORANGE AVENUE 

WEST HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 06516 

TELEPHONE (203) 934-6321, EXT. 280 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Calendar for 1973-1974 



September 10-11, 1973 Monday-Tuesday 
4:30-7:30 p.m. 



September 12, 1973 
September 14, 1973 



Wednesday 
Friday 



Registration of new graduate students 
for the September trimester 

Fall trimester classes start 



Last day to file petition for January 
Graduation 



November 21-22, 1973 Wednesday-Thursday Thanksgiving (holiday) 



December 10-15, 1973 Monday-Saturday 

December 18-19, 1973 Tuesday-Wednesday 
4:30-7:30 p.m. 

December 20, 1973 Thursday 



Final examinations 

Registration of new graduate students 
for the January trimester 

Last day to file petition for June 
Graduation 



January 2, 1974 



Wednesday 



Winter trimester classes start 



February 18, 1974 



Monday 



Washington's Birthday ( legal holiday ) 
Monday classes will meet Friday, 
February 22 



March 27-April 2, 1974 Wednesday-Tuesday Final examinations 



April 3-4, 1974 
4:30-7:30 p.m. 


Wednesday-Thursday 


Registration of new graduate students 
for the April trimester 


April 5, 1974 


Friday 


Last day to file petition for comple- 
tion of degree requirements in July 


April 8, 1974 


Monday 


Spring trimester classes start 


May 27, 1974 


Monday 


Memorial Day (legal holiday) Mon- 
day classes will meet Friday, May 31 


July 4, 1974 


Thursday 


Independence Day (legal holiday) 
Thursday classes will meet Friday, 
July 5 


July 1-6, 1974 


Monday-Saturday 


Final examinations 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 2 

General Requirements 6 

Master of Business Administration 12 

Master of Business Administration Concentrations 16 

Industrial Administration Interdisciplinary Program 20 

Master of Public Administration 21 

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering 24 

Master of Science in Operations Research 24 

Master of Science (in computer and information science) 24 

Master of Science in Criminal Justice 28 

Course Descriptions 31 

Faculty 53 

Campus Map 56 



This catalog supercedes all previous catalogs and brochures published 
by the Graduate School and describes academic programs to be offered 
during 1973-74. Graduate students admitted to the University in the fall 
of 1973 and thereafter are bound by the regulations published in this 
catalog. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of the 
Dean, the Graduate School. Prospective students seeking application blank 
and further information should write or call the Office of the Dean, the 
Graduate School. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Marvin K. Peterson, M.Ed., L. H. D. 
President 

Phillip S. Kaplan, Ph. D. 

Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Joseph A. Parker, Ph. D. 
Dean of the Graduate School 

Alexis N. Sommers, Ph. D. 

Associate Dean of the Graduate School 

George A. Schaefer, M. B. A. 
Associate Dean for Administration 



ACCREDITATION 

The University of New Haven is fully accredited as a general purpose 
institution by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 

On June 4, 1969, the Connecticut Commission for Higher Education 
authorized the University of New Haven to establish a Graduate School 
and licensed the University to award the degrees of Master of Business Ad- 
ministration and Master of Science in Industrial Engineering. Since then, 
the Commission has accredited the Master of Public Administration and 
the Master of Science in Criminal Justice programs. 

Representative memberships in which the University is an active parti- 
cipant include the Association of Independent Colleges, the Assembly of 
the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, the College 
Entrance Examining Board, the American Society of Engineering Educa- 
tion, the Educational Testing Service, American Council on Education, 
American Association for Higher Education, Association of Urban Univer- 
sities, Council for the Advancement of Small Colleges, and the National 
Commission on Accrediting. 



PROLOGUE 

The Graduate School was established in the Fall, 1969. The first grad- 
uate degrees were awarded in June, 1971, and marked a new phase in the 
University's development. 

A graduate program involves a commitment, or rather a major responsi- 
bility, to provide a graduate faculty and resources capable of providing 
sound instruction and a dynamic learning experience. The University has 
made this commitment. 

Higher education serves both the individual students and the total so- 
ciety. Universities exist as essential components of modern life. Society is 
ever changing as it seeks to solve both old and new problems and to 
create a better life for each of its members. 

The role of the University in meeting the needs of a dynamic society 
is to provide educated men and women trained to meet the manpower 
requirements of such a society. 

It is the policy of the University to train men and women to lead pro- 
ductive lives and fulfill the needs of the urban environment by offering a 
broad range of flexible programs. In scheduling courses, the Graduate 
School seeks to accommodate both part-time and full-time students. Grad- 
uate courses and certain fields of concentration are also available to 
qualified men and women who wish to update their previous training or 
to acquire new professional skills without pursuing a formal degree ob- 
jective. The Graduate School is therefore open to all qualified citizens. 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The University of New Haven offers graduate programs leading to the 
degrees of 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Science in Criminal Justice 

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering 

Master of Science in Operations Research 

Master of Science ( in computer and information science ) 
Students may elect a field of concentration within each program. Such con- 
centration consists of a group of electives in a particular area. For example, 
students may take a field of concentration in Finance by electing a se- 
quence of four courses offered by the Departments of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics. 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
I. Admission 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must submit: 

( a ) a formal application; 

( b ) letters of reference; and 

( c ) complete official transcripts of all previous college work. 

Admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate 
record. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college is required for ad- 
mission. 

In support of their application, students may submit their scores from 
either the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business or the Graduate 
Record Examination ( Aptitude Test and Advanced Test ) . A student may be 
required to take one of these tests. All MSCJ applicants must have a per- 
sonal interview with the Director of Criminal Justice or his representative 
and take the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination as part 
of the admission procedure. To schedule an appointment, please call Dr. 
Craig Parker at 203-934-6321, Ext. 374. GRE applications are available at 
the Graduate Office. 

Foreign students must submit their score on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). A student who scores less than 500 will be 
required to take special work in English. These students will be required 
to take E 600 The Uses of Language which is offered each trimester by the 
Department of English. 

Undergraduate courses required to meet graduate prerequisites may not 
count toward meeting the requirements for a graduate degree. 

Students may be admitted at the start of any trimester. 

Students must register for the first time in person at which time they will 
have an opportunity to review their undergraduate work with a member 
of the faculty and plan a program of study. At this time, a student's pre- 
vious work is reviewed by a member of the faculty who determines what 
course or courses may be waived, if any. This initial meeting provides an 
opportunity for the student to discuss with a faculty member his personal 
goals, academic strengths, and a possible area of concentration. Subse- 
quent registration for each trimester will generally be handled by mail. 

Students may request academic counseling at any time. Appointments 
with members of the graduate staff and faculty should be scheduled 
through the Office of the Graduate School. 

It is the student's responsibility to select courses in accordance with pre- 
requisites, the advisor's recommendations, the departmental plan of study 
(if required), and the requirements for the degree. 

A student is not required to file a formal plan of study with the Grad- 
uate School. It is the student's responsibility to meet the stated require- 
ments for the degree. This policy is consistent with the University's tradi- 
tion of offering a flexible curriculum to meet the particular needs of an 
individual. 

6 



II. Academic Standards 

A student must maintain a 3.0 quality point ratio (QPR) for graduation. 

The Graduate School has a grading system as follows: A — superior per- 
formance, B — good performance, C — passing performance, D — unsatisfac- 
tory performance, and F — failure. The quality points by grade are as fol- 
lows: A=4, B=3, C=2, D=0, and F=0. A grade of D and F carry no 
graduate credit and must be repeated. 

A student may take a course over, but the original grade remains on the 
transcript. A low quality point ratio must be raised by taking additional 
courses, or by repeating courses, until the minimum necessary for gradua- 
tion is obtained. If at any time a graduate student's quality point ratio 
drops below 3.0, the Graduate School will place the student on academic 
probation. A quality point ratio of less than 3.0 may be grounds for dis- 
missal from the Graduate School, if this is the recommendation of a formal 
review. 

It is expected that a graduate student will receive grades of A and B 
throughout his career at the University. If a student feels that his class 
performance will not result in a grade of B or better, he should question his 
preparation and objectives, and withdraw from the course. 



III. Transfer Credit and Waiver of Courses 

Credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other accredited in- 
stitutions. However, a student must complete a minimum of 30 graduate 
credit hours in residence at the University of New Haven. 

Certain required courses in each program may be waived on the basis 
of undergraduate courses taken at other accredited institutions. For a 
course to be waived, a student must first secure the written approval of the 
Department Chairman or a faculty member acting for the Department 
Chairman. The basis for waiving certain courses in each program is outlined 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

Any waiver decision is based upon a student's academic record. The de- 
cision to waive a course is also based upon the assumption that the student 
has a good grasp of the material covered in that course. Therefore, a 
student may subsequently be required to take a course which had been 
waived previously. No course that has been waived can be taken for 
elective credit. 



IV. General Information 

The Graduate School operates on a trimester system. During an academic 
year, there are three trimesters of 13 weeks each, including the final ex- 
amination period. Classes generally meet once each week in the late after- 
noon and evening. On occasion a few classes are scheduled Saturday morn- 
ings. The first trimester begins the second week of September and ends the 



second week of December; the second trimester begins in January and ends 
the first week of April; the third trimester begins in mid-April and ends 
in early July. 

Students must complete all requirements for their degree within 5 years 
of the date of initial matriculation in the program. Any extension of the 
time must have the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. 



V. Cancellation of Classes 

In the event that it becomes necessary to cancel graduate classes due to 
inclement weather, radio announcements starting approximately 3:00 P.M. 
will be made on all local New Haven radio stations plus WICC, WATR, 
WTBY, WWCO, WCDQ, WADS, WNLC, WTIC, and WFIF. 

An announcement of the cancellation of undergraduate day classes does 
not apply to the late afternoon and early evening graduate classes. The 
cancellation of graduate classes will be announced independently. 

VI. Requirements for the Thesis & Seminar Project 

Students engaged in independent study for the preparation of a thesis 
or seminar project select, or are assigned, a faculty advisor who acts as the 
student's research advisor until the thesis or seminar project is completed. 

A thesis or seminar project is deposited permanently in the University 
Library. Students are required to submit two copies of a thesis or seminar 
project to the Library. The copies should not be bound. Binding will be 
done by the Library. 

Additional copies of a thesis or seminar project are generally required. 
For this requirement and other regulations regarding the preparation of a 
thesis or seminar project, students should consult the "Manual for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses and Technical Projects." Copies of the 
manual are available in the Graduate School office. 



VII. Awarding of Degrees 

The University will award degrees twice a year, at commencement in 
January and in June. 

Students completing the requirements for a degree at the end of the fall 
trimester will receive the degree in January; students completing the re- 
quirements for a degree at the end of the winter trimester will receive the 
degree at the June commencement; and students completing the require- 
ments for a degree at the end of the spring trimester will receive the 
degree the following January. Students completing the requirements for a 
degree in early July will receive a formal statement that they have com- 
pleted all requirements for their degree and will formally be awarded their 
degree in January. 



Candidates for a degree must file a petition with the Graduate School 
the first week of the trimester in which they expect to complete the require- 
ments for the degree. Forms for this purpose are available in the Graduate 
School Office. Upon submission of this petition, the Graduate School will 
review the candidate's record and certify that he has met the requirements 
for the degree. The graduation fee must accompany the petition. 

Students completing a thesis or seminar project as part of their degree 
requirement must file a petition in the same manner but must also submit 
their complete and final manuscript to their thesis or project advisor prior 
to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which they expect to com- 
plete the requirements for their degree. 



VIII. Auditor 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and is expected to participate in 
class discussions and complete the required assignments. An auditor receives 
no grade or credit toward any graduate degree. Auditor status does not 
imply admission to any of the graduate degree programs. There is a special 
"Application for Study as an Auditor" form available in the Graduate Office. 



IX. Tuition and Fees— 1973-74 

Non-refundable fees: 



application fee 




$15.00 


registration fee 




5.00 


auditor application fee 




5.00 


graduation fee 




30.00 


Other fees : 






tuition per credit hour 




60.00 


auditor, per course 




125.00 


non-credit English course 


(E 600) 


75.00 


non-credit accounting course (A 600) 


75.00 



Tuition for graduate courses is due at registration. However the Univer- 
sity permits graduate students to pay their tuition on an installment basis, 
remitting one-half with the registration form or by the first day of the 
trimester and the balance within thirty days. Master Charge and Bank- 
Americard are accepted by the University for tuition. 

Students are responsible for the payment of tuition to the University 
even though some companies will reimburse employees for tuition. It is 
the responsibility of students to arrange with their employer for reimburse- 
ment. 

For a student to be eligible for a refund, he must formally notify the 
Graduate Office of his intention to withdraw and complete the withdrawal 
form either by mail or phone. The date on the withdrawal form deter- 
mines the amount of refund, if any, due the student. 

9 



The refund policy for graduate students who withdraw from any course 
or from the program is as follows: 100% refund of tuition upon formal with- 
drawal prior to the second regularly scheduled class meeting, 75% refund 
of tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the third regularly scheduled 
class meeting, 50% refund tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the 
fourth regularly scheduled class meeting, 25% refund of tuition upon formal 
withdrawal prior to the fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. No refund 
will be made after the fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. 



X. Financial Aid 

Financial aid is available to graduate students in the form of scholar- 
ships, grants, loans, bursary work, and work-study programs. 

The University provides full tuition scholarships to outstanding candi- 
dates, based upon academic achievement, financial need, and potential 
contribution in the field of study. Partial tuition grants are also available 
for those students needing help to pursue their degree on a part-time basis. 

Graduate students may apply for bursary work which includes those 
student jobs which are available throughout the campus. Typically, a job 
requires an average of ten hours a week. The Work-Study program is de- 
signed to enable students having financial need to work through the school 
year. Work assignments are made on campus and also with several non- 
profit community organizations. 

The Law Enforcement Assistance Programs 

Loans. The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 196S es- 
tablished the Law Enforcement Student Loan Program which makes avail- 
able ten year, interest bearing (7%) notes of up to $1,800 per academic 
year to full-time students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs 
leading to degrees in areas directly related to law enforcement. These loans 
can be cancelled at the rate of 25% for each year of employment in a public, 
state, local, or federal law enforcement agency. 

Grants. Grants are available to full-time employees of a publicly funded 
law enforcement agency under the Law Enforcement Student Grant Pro- 
gram. Payments up to $200 per trimester are provided to full-time or part- 
time students working toward a degree in this field. A recipient must agree 
to remain with a law enforcement agency for two years after completion 
of studies funded by this grant. 

The State of Connecticut and other states have established loan programs 
offering long term loans at low interest rates. In Connecticut, a student 
may borrow up to a maximum of $1500 each school year. Repayment starts 
one year after graduation. If the family's income (adjusted) is under 
$15,000 annually, federal interest benefits cover the full interest while in 
attendance. 

Full information and applications for financial aid can be obtained from 
the Director of Financial Aid, University of New Haven, 

10 



XI. Graduate School Ethics 

It is Graduate School policy that each student be expected to complete 
all course requirements on his own initiative and endeavor, with no collab- 
oration unless specifically authorized by an instructor. In addition, material 
used by a student but authored by another individual, publisher, company, 
government, or similar organization shall be identified as such by approp- 
riate footnotes or references. Violations of this policy, either in fact or in 
spirit, will normally be handled by the instructor involved. Certain cases 
may be referred to the Graduate Planning and Policy Committee, which 
also hears all appeals resulting from instructor actions. The Committee's de- 
cisions shall be viewed as final, with appeal only to the President and 
Board of Governors. 



11 



MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The general purpose of the MBA program at the University of New 
Haven is the education of men and women at the graduate level for 
careers in business administration. Vital to this objective is the develop- 
ment of a management perspective enabling students to see the totality 
of management rather than the narrow concerns of the specialist. Specifi- 
cally, the program strives to: 

1. develop a professional point of view with respect to managing an 
organization; 

2. equip students with the modern analytical and quantitative tools of 
decision-making; 

3. impart an understanding of the tasks and problems of management 
at all levels by means of case studies and simulation; and 

4. increase the student's knowledge and skills in particular management 
function. 



Requirements for the MBA Degree 

A maximum of 45 semester hours with a thesis or a minimum of 33 
semester hours is required of candidates for the MBA degree. 

A maximum of 12 semester hours of required courses in the MBA pro- 
gram may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses taken at ac- 
credited institutions. Courses in the MBA program that may be waived are: 
Macroeconomic Analysis, Quantitative Methods I, Marketing, and Finance. 

Each candidate must complete a minimum of 30 graduate semester hours 
in residence at the University of New Haven in order to qualify for the 
MBA degree. 

Of the 12 semester hours of electives in the MBA program, 6 semester 
hours may be taken in graduate work offered in other programs without 
permission. 

Undergraduate courses may not be counted in meeting the minimum 33 
credits required for the MBA degree. 

A student must complete the basic core before taking advanced courses 
in the MBA program. The basic core consists of EC 601, EC 602, BA 603, 
BA 604 or BA 605. EC 601 and BA 603 may be waived. 

Candidates for the MBA degree are urged to write a thesis as part of 
the requirement for the degree. Candidates who elect not to write a thesis 
must take two additional courses in place of Thesis Seminar. 

Students in the MBA program should be familiar with the use of com- 
puters in solving problems. The use of a computer is required in a num- 
ber of courses in the MBA program. Students deficient in this area should 
register for Introduction to Digital Computers (IE 603) as an elective 
early in their program of study. 

MBA candidates may instead elect to take an undergraduate computer 
course (IE 102 Introduction to the Computer or IE 105 Technical Data 
Processing) offered by the Department of Industrial Engineering. 

12 



Waiver Policy 

For a course to be waived, a student must first secure the written ap- 
proval of the department chairman or a faculty member acting for the 
chairman of the department in which the course is offered. Only the 
following courses may be waived: Macroeconomic Analysis, Quantitative 
Methods I, Marketing, and Finance. 

Macroeconomic Analysis may be waived in the case of a student who 
holds an undergraduate degree in economics or has had a minimum of 6 
semester hours of intermediate level economic theory or analysis. A full 
year of economic principles is not considered an intermediate level course. 

Quantitative Methods I may be waived in the case of a student who has 
had at least 12 semester hours of college mathematics. 

Marketing may be waived in the case of a student who holds an under- 
graduate degree in marketing or has taken a minor in marketing, including 
courses in marketing management and marketing research. 

Finance may be waived in the case of a student who holds an under- 
graduate degree in finance or has taken a minimum of 6 semester hours 
of advanced level courses in finance, including 3 semester hours of money 
and banking. 

A course that has been waived cannot be taken for elective credit. 



Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for Thesis Seminar. The 
thesis must show ability to organize material in a clear and original manner 
and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with special competence 
in the subject matter of the thesis. A first draft of the thesis must be pre- 
sented to the candidate's advisor at least 4 weeks prior to the end of the 
term in which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for 
the MBA degree. No final examination on the thesis is required. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the University Library. Students 
are required to submit two copies of the thesis to the Library. Additional 
copies of the thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other 
regulations regarding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult 
the "Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Technical Pro- 
jects." Copies of the manual are available in the Graduate School office. 



13 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

°EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 602 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

*BA 603 Quantitative Methods I 3 

BA 604 Quantitative Methods II or 

°°BA 605 Quantitative Methods III 3 

*BA 609 Marketing 3 

*BA 615 Finance 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

BA 637 Management 3 

*°*BA 635 Thesis Seminar 3 

Electives 12 

45 
* Indicates courses that may be waived. 
° "Taken by students who waive BA 603. 
*** Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional 
courses in place of Thesis Seminar. 



ind Title Credit 

Accounting 

Advanced Corporate Tax Planning I 3 

Advanced Corporate Tax Planning II 3 

Advanced Problems in Budgeting 3 

Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

Managerial Accounting Seminar 3 
Financial Institutions and Capital 

Markets 3 

Monetary and Central Banking Policy 3 

Commercial Management 3 

Managerial Economics 3 
Marketing Research and Information 

Systems 3 
Mathematical Models and Methods in 

Marketing 3 

International Business Operations 3 

Current Problems in Corporate Finance 3 

Investments ........ 3 

Seminar in Futures Market Analysis 3 

Forecasting 3 

Heal Estate: Principles and Practices 3 

Insurance: Principles and Practices 3 

14 



Elective Courses 


Course N 


A 


600 


A 


630 


A 


631 


A 


640 


A 


650 


A 


661 


BA 


617 


BA 


619 


BA 


622 


BA 


633 


BA 


639 


BA 


641 


BA 


643 


BA 


645 


BA 


649 


BA 


6S5 


BA 


657 


BA 


661 


BA 


669 



BA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 3 

BA 674 Business Law II: Business Organizations 

and Negotiable Instruments 3 
BA 675 Business Law III: Real Property, Bail- 
ments and Common Carriers 3 
BA 678 Business Law IV: International Legal 

Problems 3 

BA 680 Current Topics in Business 

Administration 3 

BA 685 Research Methods in Business 

Administration 3 

BA 690 Research Project in Business 

Administration 3 

E 600 The Uses of Language 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

EC 629 Public Policies Toward Business 3 

EC 641 International Economics 3 

EC 653 Econometrics 3 

EC 658 Transportation Economics 3 

EC 660 Economic Development of Japan 3 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic 

Development 3 

EC 670 Economics of Crime 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

EC 690 Research Project in Economics 3 

EC 691 Labor Legislation 3 

HM 610 Seminar in Hotel Management Theory 3 

HM 620 Financial Management 3 

HM 630 Personnel Relations Management 3 

HM 640 Executive Cuisine Development 3 

HM 690 Research Project in Hotel Administration 3 

IE 601 Management Science 3 

IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 3 



Students may select 6 hours of electives from other departments such as 
Public Administration, Criminal Justice, Psychology, Sociology, and In- 
dustrial Engineering. 



15 



MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATIONS 

Within the Master of Business Administration Program, the student is 
allowed to concentrate in a specific study area. There are several structured 
concentrations offered by various departments. The fields of concentration 
include the following: Industrial Relations, Finance, Marketing, Operations 
Research, Computer and Information Science, Accounting, Hotel Manage- 
ment, Import-Export Management, and Business Law. 

A concentration consists of four courses taken in one area. For example 
a student who elects a concentration in Industrial Relations would take 
EC 687 Collective Bargaining, EC 691 Labor Legislation, BA 673 Business 
Law I: Contracts and Sales, and P 631 Social Psychology or P 632 Group 
Dynamics and Group Treatment. 

Industrial Relations 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

EC 691 Labor Legislation 

B A 673 Business Law I : Contracts and Sales 

P 631 Social Psychology or 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 

Finance 

BA 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets or 

BA 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy or 

BA 645 Current Problems in Corporate Finance or 

BA 649 Investments or 

BA 655 Seminar in Futures Market Analysis or 

BA 669 Insurance 

Marketing 

BA 639 Marketing Research 

BA 641 Mathematical Models and Methods in Marketing 

BA 690 Research Project in Business Administration 

BA 643 International Business Operations 

Operations Research 

IE 607 Probability 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 

Computer and Information Science 

IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 

IE 605 Common Programming Languages I 

IE 610 Computer Systems Design 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 

16 



Accounting 

A 630 Advanced Corporate Tax Planning I 

A 631 Advanced Corporate Tax Planning II 

A 640 Advanced Problems in Budgeting 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 

Hotel Management 

HM 610 Seminar in Hotel Management Theory 

HM 620 Financial Management 

HM 630 Personnel Relations Management or 

HM 640 Executive Cuisine Development or 

HM 690 Research Project in Hotel Administration 

Import-Export Management 

BA 643 International Business Operations 

BA 690 Research Project in Business Administration 

EC 641 International Economics 

EC 660 Economic Development of Japan 

Business Law 

BA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

BA 674 Business Law II: Business Organizations and Negotiable 
Instruments 

BA 675 Business Law III: Real Property, Bailments and Com- 
mon Carriers 

BA 678 Business Law IV: International Legal Problems 



MBA Program Options 

There are two graduate business programs that require extensive under- 
graduate training. They are accounting and hotel management. The Master 
of Business Administration degree program with the appropriate option 
allows the graduate student to complete the required undergraduate core 
in either discipline while satisfying the requirements for the MBA. For 
example, a student selecting the MBA with Hotel Management Option 
will be required to take a maximum of 36 graduate semester hours or a 
minimum of 30 graduate semester hours. (Anyone with an undergraduate 
degree in Hotel Management may not take this program. ) In addition, the 
student must also complete 30-36 semester hours of undergraduate Hotel 
Management courses. Similarly, the MBA with Accounting Option calls for 
a maximum of 36 graduate semester hours or a minimum of 30 graduate 
semester hours in addition to 30-36 hours of undergraduate accounting 
from either the financial accounting concentration or the managerial ac- 
counting concentration. (Anyone with an undergraduate degree in Account- 
ing may not take this program. ) 

17 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 

THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

WITH ACCOUNTING OPTION 1 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

*EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 602 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

*BA 603 Quantitative Methods I 3 

BA 604 Quantitative Methods II or 

""BA 605 Quantitative Methods III 3 

*BA 609 Marketing 3 

*BA 615 Finance 3 

BA 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

*A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

0<M> BA 635 Thesis Seminar 3 

Electives 2 _6 

36 

1 30-36 hours of undergraduate accounting from either the financial 
accounting or managerial accounting concentration. 
* Indicates courses that may be waived. However a candidate must 
complete a minimum of 30 graduate semester hours. 
* "Taken by students who waive BA 603. 
*** Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional 
courses in place of Thesis Seminar. 
2 BA 673 Business Law I and BA 674 Business Law II are recom- 
mended. 



18 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 
WITH HOTEL MANAGEMENT OPTION 1 
Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

*EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 602 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

*BA 603 Quantitative Methods 1 3 

*BA 609 Marketing 3 

*BA 615 Finance 3 

BA 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

**°BA 635 Thesis Seminar 3 

Electives _6 

36 

1 30-36 hours of undergraduate Hotel Management courses also re- 
quired. 

'Indicates courses that may be waived. However, a candidate must 
complete a minimum of 30 graduate semester hours. 
*** Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional 
courses in place of Thesis Seminar. 



ie 



INDUSTRIAL ADMINISTRATION INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM 

The Graduate School has always encouraged interdisciplinary studies. 
To foster a broader expertise in the areas of Business Administration and 
Industrial Engineering, a student can now earn both the Master of Business 
Administration and Master of Science in Industrial Engineering by success- 
fully completing the Industrial Administration Interdisciplinary Program. 

The program requires 72 semester hours or a minimum of 60 semester 
hours in order to fulfill the requirements for the degree. 

Though eight courses may be waived in the program, other appropriate 
courses will be substituted for a student whose program is less than 60 
semester hours. In addition, a minimum of 21 semester hours must be taken 
in both business and engineering subjects. 

There are sufficient elective hours to afford the student the opportunity 
to select a field of concentration from the many offered in each separate 
program. 

INDUSTRIAL ADMINISTRATION INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

*BA 615 Finance 3 

°BA 609 Marketing 3 

*BA 603 Quantitative Methods I 3 

BA 604 Quantitative Methods II or 

°*BA 605 Quantitative Methods III 3 

BA 637 Management 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

°EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 602 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

"IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 621 Operations Research I 3 

IE 622 Operations Research II 3 

°IE 602 Quality Analysis 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project or 

BA 635 Thesis Seminar 3 

"IE 607 Probability .... 3 

*IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

Electives 1 18 

Total Credit Hours 2 72 

"Indicates courses that may be waived. 
** Taken by students who waive BA 603. 
a At least 6 hours must be taken in both engineering and business 

electives. 
2 A student must complete a minimum of 60 hours in the program in 

order to receive the degree. 

20 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The general purpose of the Master of Public Administration degree at 
the University of New Haven is the training of men and women at the 
graduate level of public service careers. Specifically, the program strives 
to: 

1. equip students with the modern analytical and quantitative tools of 
decision-making and their application to the complex problems of 
government; 

2. expose the students to the wide range of administrative and manage- 
rial problems and responsibilities of government; and 

3. increase the student's knowledge and skills in the particular manage- 
ment functions of budgeting, planning, public policy formulation, 
public finance, and public personnel administration. 

Requirements for the Master of Public Administration Degree 

A maximum of 45 semester hours or a minimum of 36 semester hours is 
required of candidates for this degree. 

A maximum of 9 semester hours of required courses in the MPA pro- 
gram may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses and/ or ap- 
propriate work experience. For a course to be waived, a student must 
first secure the written approval of the department chairman or a faculty 
member acting for the chairman of the department in which the course 
is offered. Only the following courses may be waived: Seminar in Com- 
munities and Social Change, Public Administration Internship, and Research 
Project in Public Administration. 

Seminar in Communities and Social Change may be waived in the case 
of a student who has taken a minimum of 12 semester hours in sociology, 
including a course in community relations and/ or the candidate's work 
experience. 

Public Administration Internship may be waived for a student on the 
basis of the candidate's work experience. The basis for the waiver is to be 
determined by the department chairman. 

Research Project in Public Administration may be waived for a student 
on the basis of the candidate's work experience. The basis for waiver is to 
be determined by the department chairman. 

Each candidate must complete a minimum of 30 graduate semester 
hours in residence at the University of New Haven in order to qualify for 
the Master of Public Administration degree. 

Undergraduate courses may not be counted in meeting the minimum 36 
credits required for the Master of Public Administration degree. 

Students in this program should be familiar with the use of computers. 
The use of a computer is required in a number of courses in the program. 
Students deficient in this area should register for Introduction to Digital 
Computers (IE603) as an elective early in their program of study. 

Of the 12 semester hours of electives in the MPA program, 6 semester 
hours may be taken in graduate courses offered in other programs such as 
Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Economics, and Industrial En- 
gineering. 

21 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

PA 600 Principles of Public Administration 3 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

PA 691 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 3 

* PA 693 Public Administration Internship 3 

PA 635 Statistics for Public Administrators 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

°PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social 

Change 3 

PA 690 Project in Public Administration 3 

Electives 12 

45 
"Indicates courses that may be waived. 



Elective Courses 1 

Course Number and Title Credit 

PA 603 Resource Administration 3 

PA 605 The Communication Process 3 

PA 630 Covemmental Accounting 3 

PA 633 Financial Administration 3 

PA 634 Problems of Municipal Management 3 

PA 640 Purchasing 3 

PA 647 Zoning and Land Subdivision Regulation 3 

PA 650 Administrative Law 3 

PA 651 Municipal Corporations 3 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

PA 661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 3 

PA 662 Environmental Design 3 

PA 692 Seminar in Public Opinion 3 

IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 3 

PS 604 Political Parties 3 

PS 608 Legislative Process 3 

PS 616 Urban Government and Politics 3 

SO 600 Minority Group Relations 3 

SO 610 Urban Sociology 3 

22 



SO 631 Population Problems and Human Ecology 3 

P 631 Social Psychology 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

P 670 Psychology of Personality 3 

Of the 12 semester hours of electives in the MPA program, 6 se- 
mester hours may be taken in other programs, such as Business Ad- 
ministration, Criminal Justice, Economics, and Industrial Engineer- 
ing. 

A course that has been waived cannot be taken for elective credit. 



23 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 

OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

The Department of Industrial Engineering administers the MSIE and 
MSOR degree programs, and also the undesignated MS degree program 
in the area of computer and information science. The MSIE is considered 
a fifth-year or professional degree, and is designed to provide a broad 
background in operations research, man-machine systems, and human 
factors analysis. The MSOR is a professional degree based on strategic 
operations research coursework and specific elective sequences. The un- 
designated MS program in computer and information science is an in- 
terdisciplinary program with a software orientation. It is designed to pro- 
vide a high-level academic background for CIS managers and systems 
analysts in all career areas. All degree programs are open to qualified ap- 
plicants from a broad range of undergraduate degree disciplines. 



Degree Requirements 

A minimum of 30 credit hours is required in residence for any degree 
offered in the School of Engineering. Degree candidates may be required 
to complete additional coursework if it appears essential to successful pro- 
gram completion. Plans of study are normally prepared at a student's 
first registration, and may be modified throughout a candidate's academic 
career. Prerequisite course modules exist for each degree program: courses 
in this module may be waived with the written consent of the Depart- 
ment of Industrial Engineering. All waivers are conditional upon subse- 
quent academic performance, and may be removed at the discretion of 
the Department. Graduate credit may be transferred from other accredited 
institutions but in all cases the residence requirement for a degree shall 
be 30 credit hours. A thesis is not required, but all degree candidates 
must complete a technical project report as part of IE 690: Seminar Pro- 
ject, a course of independent study. Two copies of the technical project 
report are deposited in the University Library, and two additional copies 
are retained by the Department of Industrial Engineering. Project report 
format must follow the requirements contained in "A Manual for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses and Technical Projects" published by 
the Graduate School. The project report is graded, and must be approved 
by the student's project advisor, the department chairman, and the Gradu- 
ate School. Twelve months is allowed for project completion. Re-regis- 
tration may be required in order to complete course requirements. All 
grades of Inc. automatically revert to "W" twelve months after initial course 
registration. 

Interdisciplinary study is encouraged in all degree programs. Up to 
six credit hours of electives may be taken outside the School of Engineer- 
ing. Special concentrations beyond this limit may be designed with the 
written approval of the department chairman. Computer programming 

24 



ability is required of all degree candidates, and may be gained through 
IE 603: Introduction to Digital Computers, a graduate credit course, or by 
taking appropriate undergraduate courses, which carry no graduate credit. 
A special program, the Industrial Administration Interdisciplinary Program, 
is available to all MSIE candidates, and awards both an MBA and an 
MSIE degree after the completion of at least 60 hours of specified course- 
work. 

Waiver Policy 

The following courses may be waived at the discretion of the Depart- 
ment for qualified students: 

IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers may be waived only upon 
successful completion of a written examination administered by the De- 
partment of Industrial Engineering. 

EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis may be waived by a student holding an 
undergraduate degree in economics or who has had a minimum of six 
semester hours of intermediate level economic theory or analysis. Princi- 
ples of economics are not considered intermediate level course work. 

IE 601 Managment Science may be waived on the basis of undergraduate 
courses in operations research or management science. 

IE 602 Quality Analysis may be waived on the basis of undergraduate 
courses in quality control, or quality planning and analysis. 

IE 607 Probability may be waived on the basis of a minimum of six 
semester hours in undergraduate statistics, probability, and applied sto- 
chastic processes. Students seeking to waive this course may be required 
to pass a qualifying examination. 

IE 604 Management Systems may be waived on the basis of at least six 
semester hours in undergraduate management theory, information systems, 
or systems analysis. 

M 610 Computational Mathematics may be waived by a student demon- 
strating above average performance in 15 semester hours or more of under- 
graduate coursework in calculus and advanced mathematics. 

EE 610 Introduction to Cybernetics may be waived by a student hold- 
ing a degree in electrical engineering, or by a student with at least six 
semester hours in computer logic, communications theory, cybernetics, or 
switch theory. 

IE 614 Data Information Systems may be waived by a candidate with 
at least three semester hours of management information systems theory 
or computer applications. 

IE 651 Human Engineering I may be waived by a student holding a 
degree in industrial engineering, or by a student with a least six semester 
hours of human factors analysis, human engineering, methods improve- 
ment, or physiological performance. Coursework in time study or work 
analysis will not count towards the six hour requirement. 

In all cases where course waivers are uncertain, the Department of 
Industrial Engineering will administer a qualifying examination to deter- 
mine the student's actual knowledge or experience. 

25 



Degree Programs 

Candidates for the MSIE degree must complete the following core 
requirement : 

MSIE Core Module 

Course Number and Title Credit 

IE 611 Budgeting and Control 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

IE 681 Industrial Dynamics 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives 12 

30 

MSIE Prerequisite Module 

Course Number and Title Credit 

*IE 601 Management Science 3 

*IE 602 Quality Analysis 3 

*EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

*IE 607 Probability 3 

°IE 604 Management Systems 3 

*IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

18 

Candidates for the MSOR degree must complete the following core 
requirement: 

MSOR Core Module 

Course Number and Title Credit 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

IE 688 Seminar in Inferential Statistics 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives 12 

30 
Indicates waivable courses 



26 



MSOR Prerequisite Module 

Course Number and Title Credit 

°IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 3 

*IE 601 Management Science 3 

*IE 607 Probability 3 

*EE 610 Introduction to Cybernetics 3 

*M 610 Computational Mathematics 3 

*EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

18 
Candidates for the M.S. degree in the area of Computer and Information 
Science must complete the following core requirement: 

MS-CIS Core Module 

Course Number and Title Credit 

IE 605 Common Programming Languages I 3 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

EE 615 Computer Logic and Intelligence 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Design 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives 12 

30 

MS-CIS Prerequisite Module 

Course Number and Title Credit 

*IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 3 

*IE 604 Management Systems 3 

*EC 601 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

*M 610 Computational Mathematics 3 

*IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

*EE 610 Introduction to Cybernetics 3 



'Indicates waivable courses 



27 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration 
of Justice assigned a high priority to the task of improving the education 
and training of personnel entrusted with the administration of criminal 
justice in the United States. 

A key objective of the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program 
is the training and education of men and women planning careers in the 
field of criminal justice as well as the advanced training and education 
of the men and women who staff the agencies and institutions of the 
criminal justice system. 

The University views the criminal justice system as one continuous in- 
tegrated process from a study of the nature of deviant behavior to the 
role of rehabilitation and parole. 

The program stresses a broad understanding of the social and behavioral 
sciences, the institutions of the criminal justice system, and the develop- 
ment of methodological tools and skills. This is done somewhat at the ex- 
pense of courses that are narrowly professional in the belief that the field 
of criminal justice is dynamic and that a broad understanding of the social 
and behavioral sciences and the methodological skills and tools will prove 
more valuable to a student's career in the long run than narrow profes- 
sional training. 

The broad fields of the criminal justice program at the University are 
social and behavioral science, the institutions of the criminal justice sys- 
tem, and methodological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and behavioral science stress the 
theories of the behavior of man in a social order and the sanctions imposed 
by different societies to control the social behavior of their members. 

Courses in the area of criminal justice institutions stress the study of the 
existing system from the police, through the courts, the penitentiaries, and 
the system of probation and parole. 

The methodological courses expose students to the tools of research and 
analysis and the contribution of systems analysis to the efficient administra- 
tion of the criminal justice system. 

Requirements for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice Degree 

A total of 45 semester hours is required of candidates for the degree 
of Master of Science in Criminal Justice. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Criminal Justice must 
complete 21 semester hours of required courses in the core curriculum. 
In addition to the required core, students may select 24 semester hours of 
electives from one of three major areas of concentration. The three areas 
of concentration are: social and behavioral sciences, criminal justice in- 
stitutions, and criminal justice systems. 

A student may also pursue a broader program by selecting 24 semester 
hours of electives which cut across the three areas of concentration. 

Except for the required core, the student's program of study is deter- 
mined largely by the student and his faculty advisor. 

Credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other accredited in- 
stitutions. However, a student must complete a minimum of 39 graduate 
semester hours in residence at the University of New Haven in order to 
qualify for the degree of Master of Science in Criminal Justice. 

28 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 605 Seminar in Social Deviance 3 

CJ 607 Seminar in Criminal Justice Institutions 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social 

Sciences 3 

Electives 24 

45 



r and Title Credit 

Social and Behavioral Science 

Seminar in Theory and Philosophy of Law 3 

Seminar in Social Control 3 

Criminological Theory 3 

Sociology of Criminal Law 3 
Learning Theory: Applications in 

Criminal Justice 3 

Group Process in Criminal Justice 3 

Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 3 
Innovative Treatment Programs in 

Corrections 3 

Social Psychology 3 

Problems of Drug Abuse 3 

Personality Assessment 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Constitutional Law 3 

Civil Liberties and Rights 3 

Criminal Law 3 

Minority Group Relations and Urban 

Sociology 3 

Culture and Personality 3 

Comparative Social Organization 3 



Elective Courses 


Course IV 


CJ 


600 


CJ 


602 


CJ 


609 


CJ 


620 


CJ 


622 


CJ 


624 


CJ 


630 


CJ 


672 


p 


631 


p 


633 


p 


634 


p 


636 


PS 


601 


PS 


602 


PS 


605 


so 


600 


so 


605 


so 


609 



29 



cj 
cj 

CJ 


608 
610 
612 


cj 


615 


cj 
cj 


617 
618 


cj 


619 


cj 
cj 


651 
670 



Criminal Justice Institutions 

Law and Evidence 3 

Administration of Justice 3 

Concepts and Issues in Police 

Administration 3 

Forensic Science in the Administration 

of Justice 3 

Correctional Administration 3 

Probation and Parole : Theory and 

Practice 3 

Seminar in Comparative Criminal Justice 

Systems 3 

Problems in the Administration of Justice 3 
Selected Issues in Criminal Justice: 

Topics to Vary 3 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social 

Change 3 

Criminal Justice Systems 

IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 610 Data Information Systems 3 

IE 614 Computer Systems Design 3 

IE 621 Operations Research 1 3 

IE 683 Systems Analysis 3 

IE 688 Seminar in Inferential Statistics 3 

IE 689 Seminar in Descriptive Statistics 3 

Independent Study 

CJ 690 Research Project in Criminal Justice I 3 

CJ 691 Research Project in Criminal Justice II 3 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship I 3 

CJ 694 Criminal Justice Internship II 3 

CJ 695 Independent Study in Criminal Justice 3 



30 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Department of Accounting 

A600 Accounting 

The principles and procedures underlying the generation of financial 
accounting information. 

A621 Managerial Accounting 

Accounting analysis for the managerial functions of planning, controlling 
and evaluating the performance of the business firm. 

Prerequisite: A600 or 6 or more credits in ac- 
counting 

A630 Advanced Corporate Tax Planning I 

An analysis of the Federal Income Tax aspects of organizing, acquiring 
and disposing of a corporation with an emphasis on proper tax planning. 
Course coverage will include tax-free incorporations, re-organizations, divi- 
sions, and liquidations. 

Prerequisites: A335-336 Federal Income Tax 
Procedure I and II. 

A631 Advanced Corporate Tax Planning II 

An analysis of the Federal Income Tax aspects of various matters affect- 
ing the corporation and its stockholders. Course coverage will include dis- 
tributions, accumulated earnings, personal holding companies, collapsible 
corporations, sub-chapter S corporations and multiple corporations. 

Prerequisites: A630 Advanced Corporate Tax 
Planning I. 

A640 Advanced Problems in Budgeting 

Considers the principles and practical applications of budgeting for profit 
and non-profit organizations. The scope and significance of the budgeting 
process, its usefulness and limitations. Analysis of information needs for 
decision-making. Short-range and long-range planning and control of costs. 

Prerequisites: A223-224 Cost Accounting I and 
II. 

A650 Advanced Accounting Theory 

Considers the theoretical aspects of accepted accounting principles and 
their significance as a frame of reference for the evaluation of accounting 
practices. Considerable attention is focused on the role of regulatory 
agencies and professional accounting organizations with regard to their 
influences upon accounting theory and practice. 

Prerequisites: A221-222 Intermediate Account- 
ing and A332 Advanced Account- 
ing. 

31 



A661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

Advanced topics in managerial accounting. 



Prerequisite : Permission of Instructor 



Department of Business Administration 



BA603 Quantitative Methods I 

Basic mathematics and statistics for business problem solving. Includes 
set theory, matrix algebra, descriptive statistical measures, regression and 
correlation, and an introduction to differential and integral calculus. 

No prerequisite. 



BA604 Quantitative Methods II 

More advanced mathematics for business problem solving. Includes 
mathematical model building, sequences, time series analysis, finite vs. in- 
finite calculus, mathematical programming techniques. 

Prerequisite : B A603 or equivalent 



BA605 Quantitative Methods III 

Application of quantitative techniques to problems in business. Topics 
include some of the common statistical tools, Bayesian decision theory, 
and operations research techniques. 

Prerequisite: Waiver of BA603 or consent of 
instructor 

BA609 Marketing 

An intensive study of modern marketing methods and concepts for the 
student who has not had undergraduate work in marketing. Includes a 
review of marketing fundamentals, a study of the decision-making problems 
encountered by the marketing executive, and the relation of marketing to 
environmental forces. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA603-604 

BA615 Finance 

The investment, financing, and valuation of business firms. Topics include: 
discounted cash flow, return on investment, investment decisions under un- 
certainty, long and short term sources of funds, optimal financial structure, 
cost of capital, dividend policy, expansion, merger, and failure and reor- 
ganization. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

32 



BA617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

This course stresses the relationship between the financial system and 
the level, growth, and stability of aggregate economic activity. Analyzes 
the institutional and theoretical structure of monetary change and the 
manner in which financial institutions and markets transmit and influence 
the impact of monetary policy. Special attention to the role of nonmonetary 
financial intermediaries, the structure and regulation of capital markets, and 
the functions of market yields as the price mechanism that allocates saving 
to various categories of economic investments. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 

The impact of monetary change upon employment, output, and prices; 
and the formulation and execution of Federal Reserve Policy designed to 
regulate money, credit, and interest rates. 

Prerequisites: EC-601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA622 Commercial Management 

Current topics in supervision, management, personnel relations, and re- 
lated problem areas confronted by the corporate manager. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA633 Managerial Economics 

A study of the application of the major tools of economic analysis to the 
problems encountered by management in the organization of the firm. 
Topics include the theory and measurement of consumer demand, mea- 
surement and control of costs, the effects of public policy upon managerial 
decisions, and pricing techniques and the allocation of capital within the 
firm. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA635 Thesis Seminar 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress 
in the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 21 graduate hours. 

BA637 Management 

A survey of the literature of management theory. Based on a wide range 
of independent reading, the student is provided the opportunity to analyze 
and assess the contribution by major writers in the field of management 
theory. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

33 



BA639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 

A managerial approach to marketing information flow, including recogni- 
tion of information needs and an overview of marketing research as part 
of an information system. Special attention to evaluation of research design 
and measurement methods, effective utilization of research output, and 
problems encountered in establishing a marketing information system. 

Prerequisite: BA 609 

BA641 Mathematical Models and Methods in Marketing 

The treatment of the basic decision problems of marketing management 
in terms of a conceptual framework for analysis. Consideration of the role 
played by human judgments and the mathematical tools available to aid 
in these judgments in a number of marketing areas, notably market an- 
alysis, pricing decisions, advertising decisions, promotional decisions, and 
selection of distribution channels. 

Prerequisites : BA 609 & BA 639 

BA643 International Business Operations 

An integration of the international economic, environmental, and insti- 
tutional concepts and constraints as they apply to decisions made by the 
manager of international business operations. The course is designed to give 
students a grasp of strategy formulation and organization for a firm in in- 
ternational business. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA645 Current Problems in Corporate Finance 

Designed to enable students to apply the principles acquired in the basic 
course in corporate finance to the solution of advanced problems faced by 
corporate management. Topics include optimal depreciation policies and in- 
vestment credits, depletion, capital gains and dividend taxation, and 
merger valuation problems. 

Prerequisite : B A 615 

BA649 Investments 

Analysis of financial statements; fixed income securities; the valuation of 
common stocks; sources of investment information; nature of securities 
markets; strategy in portfolio management; risk management and perform- 
ance measurement. These topics are designed to acquaint the student with 
basic principles of investment. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA655 Seminar in Futures Market Analysis 

A conceptional and operational study of futures markets, the participants 
and major exchanges including an in depth analysis of the major commodi- 
ties traded and the fundamental and technical factors influencing their prices. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

34 



BA657 Forecasting 

A survey of some basic techniques and methods used in forecasting at the 
level of the firm and industry. Topics covered are naive forecasting meth- 
ods, index numbers, types of economic fluctuations, criteria for fitting esti- 
mating lines, Gompertz curve, arithmetic straight line, parabolic trend, log- 
arithmic straight line, seasonal variation, economic indicators, simple corre- 
lation and regression, multiple correlation and regression, curvilinear and 
time series regresssion. 

Prerequisites : BA 604 or B A 605 

BA661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices 

Real estate from the investor's point of view. Impact of taxation on real 
estate investments. Emphasis on commercial land use through the use of 
case studies and problems. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA669 Insurance: Principles and Practices 

Considers the Risk Management approach to insurance from the point 
of view of the management of individual and commercial firms. Also covers 
personal needs of individuals. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

Survey of the legal aspects of contracts and the results of contractual 
obligations. Legal problems stemming from the distribution of goods; gen- 
erally the rights and duties of buyers and sellers and the remedies avail- 
able to them. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

BA674 Business Law II: Business Organizations and Negotiable Instruments 
Basic introduction to problems of formation and operation of legal 
groups and general legal survey of the role of agency, partnerships and 
corporations and other complex entities in modern society. 

Prerequisite : B A 673 

BA675 Business Law III: Real Property, Bailments and Common Carriers 

Survey of the law of real property including conveyances, mortgages, 
and landlord and tenant. The law of bailments and common carriers. 

Prerequisite: BA 673 

BA678 Business Law IV: International Legal Problems 

Survey of legal problems relating to the organization and operation of 
enterprises engaged in international business activities and the reciprocal 
relations of such enterprises with domestic, foreign and supranational 
government agencies. 

Prerequisites : B A 673 & BA 674 

35 



BA680 Current Topics in Business Administration 

An integrative course that will examine the role of business in society 
and relate the business firm to its social, political, legal, and economic en- 
vironment. While the exact content of this seminar is expected to vary from 
semester to semester in accordance with the varied academic interests and 
professional backgrounds of different faculty handling the course, the basic 
theme is the role of the business firm as the "keeper" of the market 
mechanism and the means for organizing resources in the economy. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 

BA685 Research Methods in Business Administration 

Designed to familiarize the administrator with the tools and potentiali- 
ties of social research and to assist him in the presentation, interpretation, 
and application of research data. 

BA690 Research Project in Business Administration 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 



Department of Criminal Justice 

CJ600 Seminar in Theory and Philosophy of Law 

The theory and philosophy of law and the relationship between law and 
society. Emphasis on the nature of the judicial process, the issues of law 
and personal morality, non victim crimes, and the relationship of enforce- 
ment agencies to the rule of law. 

CJ601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

Interpersonal communication in teaching, supervision, and in various 
work relationships. The criminal justice worker as a resource person and 
facilitator of others is stressed. Humanistic psychology and interpersonal 
psychology provide the theoretical base. Maximum enrollment 20 students. 

CJ602 Seminar in Social Control 

An examination of the formal and informal mechanism of controlling 
or conditioning the social behavior of man vis-a-vis the system of social 
norms, laws, and institutions. The implication of organizing the system of 
justice under a punishment or rehabilitative ethic will be considered. 

CJ605 Seminar in Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating to the scope and nature of die crime problem. 
Consideration of the problems of deviancy, including social norms and 
deviancy, mental disturbances, juvenile crime, and the various possible and 
actual responses to deviancy. Various approaches to the problem of re- 
habilitation. 

36 



CJ607 Seminar in Criminal Justice Institutions 

The institutions of law and law enforcement. Institutions as rehabilita- 
tion centers and the effective administration of such centers. 

CJ608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive analysis of the rules of evidence. Topics include judicial 
notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial evidence, hear- 
say evidence, confessions and admissions, and witnesses. Emphasis on evi- 
dence in criminal cases. 

CJ609 Criminological Theory 

An analytical review of the multidisciplinary theories of criminal be- 
havior. The impact of various theoretical constructs and concepts on prac- 
tice will be critically evaluated. 

CJ610 Administration of Justice 

The machinery of justice in theory and practice. The rule of law and its 
exceptions in the actual administration of justice. Emphasis on the pro- 
gressive changes in the development of childrens' and adolescents' courts, 
probation, and classification clinics. Crime prevention and reforms of the 
criminal law. Special problems of justice and the poor. Administrative 
denials of justice, the insane offender, the white-collar criminal, and social 
reconstruction through law. 

CJ612 Concepts and Issues in Police Administration 

The development of the theory and practice of police administration in 
the United States. Significant developments and ideas of those who have 
made major contributions to American police administration. 

CJ 615 Forensic Science in the Administration of Justice 

The role of the natural science in the Administration of Justice in its 
broadest aspects. Current concepts, present status, and future needs of the 
forensic sciences. Specific topics in the forensic sciences and its inter- 
relationship with legal issues would also be included. 

CJ617 Correctional Administration 

The basic organization and objectives of a department of correction. 
Specific administrative principles required for effective conduct and opera- 
tion of a correctional organization. 

CJ618 Probation and Parole: Theory and Practice 

The philosophy, theory, and methods employed in probation, parole, and 
institutional treatment of the offender. The role of authority, casework, 
classification, treatment policy, and administrative organization in deter- 
mining the consequences of correctional practice. 

CJ619 Seminar in Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 

A cross cultural study of police, court, and correctional systems and 
methods. 

37 



CJ620 Sociology of Criminal Law 

A study of the social origins and consequences of criminal law and legal 
processes. Emphasis on problems of legal change and the structure and 
functioning of legal sanctions. Emphasis on social and institutional pres- 
sures in creating socio-legal policy. 

CJ622 Learning Theory: Applications in Criminal Justice 

Applications of the psychology of learning to police and correction settings. 

CJ624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 

Small group interaction; both theoretical and experimental facets of group 
process are presented. Group counseling and encounter groups. 

CJ628 Introduction to Systems Theory 

Concepts of systems theory and systems analysis in contemporary socio- 
technical environments. 

CJ630 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

A general introduction to the field of delinquency and crime, including 
all aspects of the social, legal, and personal matrix out of which these forms 
of behavior emerge. Special emphasis will be given to the process and im- 
plications of delinquency labeling. 

CJ635 Statistics in the Public Sector 

Statistical techniques applied to the public sector. Descriptive statistics: 
measures of central tendency and variability. Introduction to statistical in- 
ference including sampling distributions and tests of significance. Some 
techniques of non-parametric statistics, multiple regression, and elementary 
decision theory. Analysis of variance and co-variance. 

CJ637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students relating to current issues and concerns in 
the field of criminal justice. Each student will be required to write a paper 
and deliver an oral presentation on his selected topic. Maximum enroll- 
ment 12 students. 

CJ642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 

Research methodology as applied to problems and issues in the field of 
criminal justice. 

CJ651 Problems in the Administration of Justice 

/\ critical analysis will be made of significant problems or obstacles in 
organization of social justice. Formal and informal processes and their in- 
teractional functions will be critically examined. 

38 



CJ670 Selected Issue in Criminal Justice 

An in-depth study of various social phenomena or problems that impinge 
directly on various components of the criminal justice system. Students will 
be involved individually and collectively in an incisive examination of a 
particular topic. Topic will vary each trimester. 

CJ672 Innovative Treatment Programs in Corrections 

The theory and practice of a wide range of innovative correctional 
treatment modalities will be analyzed. Students will be given the oppor- 
tunity to participate in various experiential exercises and to develop and 
propose new treatment approaches. 

CJ690 Research Project in Criminal Justice 

Independent study under the guidance of an advisor in an area of mutual 
interest. 

CJ693 Criminal Justice Internship 

The student's formal educational development will be complemented by 
field placement experience in various criminal justice settings or agencies. 
Field experience will be supervised by designated agency and departmental 
personnel. 

CJ695 Independent Study in Criminal Justice 

Student will engage in a directed independent learning experience. The 
topic and format to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty. 

Department of English 

E600 The Uses of Language 

Limited to qualified international students who speak a language other 
than English. Emphasis upon conversation, pronunciation, composition, 
and laboratory work in the English language. 

Department of Economics 

EC601 Macroeconomic Analysis 

An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, government 
finance, and money influencing national income and output, employment, 
the price level, and rate of growth. Policies for economic stability and 
growth. 

No prerequisite. 

EC602 Microeconomic Analysis 

Topics in resource allocation and price determination. Theories of 
choice of consumers, firms, resource owners under monopoly, nonopsony, 
competition, and alternative market forms. 

No prerequisite. 

39 



EC608 Economics for Public Administrators 

An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, government 
expenditure, and money influencing national income, output, employment, 
and price level, and growth rate. Special emphasis upon the roles of fiscal 
and monetary policy and the economics of contemporary social problems. 

No prerequisite. 

EC625 Industrial Relations 

Collective bargaining strategies and policies of management and unions, 
union structure and tactics, labor legislation, wage theories, and problems 
of union security, unemployment and government control. 

Prerequisite: EC 601-602 

EC629 Public Policies Toward Business 

A survey of the economic aspects of government and business relations. 
Emphasizes the concept of public control over certain types of business and 
certain forms of business activity. Combination movements, pricing pro- 
cedures, anti-trust laws and agencies enforcing them, regulation of trans- 
portation and public utilities, rate-making for transport, and pricing public 
utility services. 

Prerequisite: EC 601-602 

EC641 International Economics 

A study of the basic theory and major institutions of international 
economic relations. Examines critically the techniques and background of 
protectionism and free trade, and the analysis of customs unions, and price 
and exchange rate changes. The theory of comparative advantage, the gains 
from trade and the terms of trade. The balance of payments and national 
income. Capital movements and economic growth. The evolution of the 
world economy and international economic institutions. Effects of growth 
on trade, and trade on growth. Monopolistic practices in international trade. 
The international monetary system and international monetary reforms. 

Prerequisite: EC 601-602 

EC653 Econometrics 

A presentation of the important statistical concepts used in econometrics. 
Topics covered are regression theory, multiple regression, regression ex- 
tensions, correlation, serial correlation, correlated regressor and error, the 
identification problem, selected estimating techniques. 

Prerequisites: EC 601-602 
BA 603-604 

EC658 Transportation Economics 

A study of the principal economic problems arising in connection with 
the development and regulation of railroads and other modes of transport. 

Prerequisite: EC 601-602 

40 



EC660 Economic Development of Japan 

A study in the modernization and economic growth of modern Japan 
since the Meiji Restoration (1869). Topics include the role of government 
and planning, and of foreign trade, investment, and technology; resource 
allocation, economic organization, capital formation, agricultural policies, 
population growth, and social change. 

No prerequisite. 

EC665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 

Structure of the urban and regional economy; goals processes, problems 
and policy in urban and regional economic development. 

Prerequisite: EC 601-602 

EC670 Economics of Crime 

Topics include the economic costs of crime; the costs of preventing crime; 
the impact of white collar crime on American society. 

Prerequisite: EC 601-602 

EC687 Collective Bargaining 

Emphasis on the negotiating process. The labor contract as it involves 
wages, worker security, management authority, and handling of grievances 
arising during the life of the contract. 

Prerequisite: EC 625 

EC690 Research Project in Economics 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 

EC691 Labor Legislation 

Considers the legal status of unions as set forth in state and federal 
legislation, and court decisions. Reviews recent NLRB rulings. Protective 
legislation dealing with wages, hours, child labor, and accident and un- 
employment compensation. 

Prerequisite: EC 625 

Department of Electrical Engineering 

EE610 Introduction to Cybernetics 

Properties of and types of systems, including resolution of graphs and 
resolution level. Definitions of cybernetics. Information, signals, codes, 
and modelling structures appropriate to systems. Digital computers, algo- 
rithms, programs, logic nets, and studies in cybernetic modelling. Infor- 
mation and communication theory, including perception, sensors in inani- 
mate systems, and man-machine communication. 

No prerequisite. 

EE615 Computer Logic and Intelligence 

Sources of artificial intelligence, encompassing introductory concepts, 
basic theories, deterministic inference models, statistical inference models, 
and neurophysical models. Application of machines to learning problems, 
induction, games, theorem proving, neutral sets, pattern recognition, and 
heuristic programming. 

Prerequisite: EE 610 

41 



EE620 Analog Computers 

An advanced treatment of the theory and design of electronic analog 
computers and digital differential analyzers. Principles and operation of 
function generators, multipliers, integrators, and analog-to-digital convert- 
ers. Solution of linear and non-linear differential equations. Applications 
to the solution of engineering and industrial process problems. 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 



Department of Hotel Administration 

KM610 Seminar in Hotel Management Theory 

Detailed analysis of current developments in the hospitality and travel 
industries. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in Hotel 
Management or permission of the 
instructor 



HM620 Financial Management 

Utilization of mathematical techniques applicable to solving managerial 
and technical problems involving investment decisions, real estate site 
selection, property evaluation, and financial analysis. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in Hotel 
Management or permission of the 
instructor 

HM630 Personnel Relations Management 

Topics include organizational behavior, personnel selection, placement, 
supervision, job evaluation, wage and salary administration, motivation, and 
union-management relations. Case studies and role playing are integral 
parts of the course. 

Prerequisites: HM 610 and HM 620 

HM640 Executive Cuisine Development 

An advanced course which covers current methods and principles of food 
preparation, variety, and garnishments. Emphasis placed on evaluation and 
preparation! Topics include Haute Cuisine, Convenience, and International. 
Demonstration only. 

Prerequisites: HM 610 and HM 620 

HM690 Research Project in Hotel Administration 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisites: HM 610 and HM 620 

42 



Department of Industrial Engineering 

IE601 Management Science 

Introduction to management science and operations research philosophy, 
techniques, and areas of application. Topics include linear programming, 
inventory and queuing theory, dynamic programming, and systems analysis. 

Prerequisites: BA 604, BA 605, or IE 607 

IE602 Quality Analysis 

Concepts of quality control and statistical quality analysis. Sampling 
techniques and decision processes. 

Prerequisites : IE 601 and IE 607 

IE603 Introduction to Digital Computers 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science, including 
computer hardware, software, programming concepts, and information and 
data processing. Exercises in program solving through the use of a com- 
puter and a simple programming language. 

No prerequisite. 

IE604 Management Systems 

Techniques in industrial and governmental systems management, includ- 
ing CPM, PERT, systems analysis, and benefit-cost analysis. Organizational 
theory and management information system concepts. 

No prerequisite. 

IE607 Probability 

A first course in advanced probability and stochastic processes. Topics 
include discrete and continuous distributions, Markov chains, and Monte 
Carlo techniques. 

Prerequisite : Advanced calculus 

IE610 Computer Systems Design 

Techniques for designing, installing, and operating computer systems 
and their peripheral equipment. Concepts of decisions with respect to 
compiler and hardware selection. Development of operating procedures, 
form design, systems charting, and documentation. 

Prerequisites : IE 603 and IE 614 

IE61 1 Budgeting and Control 

An analytioal approach as applied to the principles and policies of opera- 
tional budgeting and control of expense and capital investments. Includes 
forecasting techniques, development of totally integrated systems with tra- 
ditional financial statements and controls from top management to first 
line supervision. 

Prerequisite: A 600 

43 



IE614 Data Information Systems 

Introduction to automated information systems planning and operations 
and their impact on management decision-making, control functions, and 
communication capabilities. An overview of concepts and procedures with 
applications in urban environments, large organizations, and governmental 
agencies. Selected case studies are analyzed. 

Prerequisite: IE 603 

1E615 Transportation and Distribution 

Introduction to transportation science with emphasis on physical distri- 
bution problems. Survey of operations research models and optimization 
strategies and their roles in transportation systems management. 

Prerequisite: IE 601 

IE619 Enterprise Design and Evaluation 

An analysis of the principles and methods used in estimating the prob- 
able economic characteristics of proposed enterprises. The student is re- 
quired to formulate a proposed enterprise, including the technical, finan- 
cial, and organizational requirements. 

Prerequisite: IE 601 

IE621 Linear Programming 

Introduction to the philosophy and methodology of operations research. 
Emphasis on the analysis of linear programming theory and application. 
Includes assignments, transportation, and simplex methods. 

Prerequisites: BA 604, BA 605, or IE 607 

IE622 Queuing Theory 

Elements of queuing theory including finite and infinite cases. Single 
server and multiple server parallel channels, series queues, and special 
cases are analyzed. Experimental methods, including simulation, are pre- 
sented in the context of industrial environments. 

Prerequisites : IE 601 and IE 607 

IE623 Decision Analysis 

Decision theory, game theory, and stochastic decision processes. Benefit- 
cost analyses under uncertainty. 

Prerequisites : BA 605 or IE 607 

IE631 Production Engineering 

An analysis and practical application of engineering activity that results 
in the transformation of natural resources into a finished product. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 602 

IE641 Quality Control Economics 

An economic managerial analysis of statistical quality control sampling 
and control chart systems with application to accepted and hybrid systems. 

Prerequisites: IE 602 and IE 607 or BA 604 

44 



IE643 Reliability and Maintainability 

The basic theory and methodology of reliability and maintainability, in- 
cluding application of discrete and continuous distribution and statistical 
designs. Reliability, estimation, structure models, and growth models. 

Prerequisites: IE 602 and IE 607 or BA 604 

IE65 1-652 Human Engineering I & II 

A broad coverage of the physiological, psychological, and sociological 
aspects of man and the society in which he lives and works. Special topics 
include human factors, motivation, group dynamics, and ekistics. 

No prerequisite. 

IE655 Value Engineering 

Consideration of value analysis from the point of view of design, manu- 
facturability, procurement, installation, and maintainability in order to 
optimize value in products. 

Prerequisite: IE 602 

IE663 Tooling Techniques I 

A survey of advanced tooling techniques and metal forming theories, 
with emphasis on practical applications and economic analyses. 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 602 and IE 607 



IE664 Tooling Techniques II 

Topics in contemporary tooling and metal forming research, including 
non-metallic and composite materials in modern manufactured products. 
Theories of bonding and cutting are analyzed and placed in a manufactur- 
ing perspective. 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 602 and IE 607 

IE681 Industrial Dynamics 

A study of the behavior of firms and industries by computer simulation 
of their organizational structure and decision criteria. 

Prerequisites: IE 603 and IE 622, BA 604 or 
BA 605 with IE 603 

IE683 Systems Analysis 

Techniques and philosophies defining the concept of systems analysis are 
presented in detail and illustrated with large scale case studies. Diverse 
systems are analyzed covering the social, urban, industrial, and military 
spheres. Techniques presented include utility theory, decision analysis, and 
technological forecasting. 

Prerequisites: IE 601, BA 604 or BA 605 

IE685 Theory of Optimization 

Nonlinear and dynamic programming with special reference to computer 
analysis of optimization problems. 

Prerequisites: M 620 and IE 621, BA 604 or 
BA605 

45 



IE686 Inventory Analysis 

Inventory theory and practical applications in operating inventory sys- 
tems. Model construction, optimization, and computer simulation. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 622, BA 604 or 
BA605 

IE688 Seminar in Inferential Statistics 

Inferential statistical designs, including basic statistical tests and analysis 
of variance. 

Prerequisite: Three credit hours of statistics. 

IE689 Seminar in Descriptive Statistics 

Satistical theories and applications of correlation analysis, multiple linear 
regression, nonlinear regression, and analysis of covariance. 

Prerequisite: Three credit hours of statistics. 

IE690 Seminar Project 

Independent study under the guidance of an advisor into an area of mu- 
tual interest, such study terminating in a technical report of academic 
merit. Research may constitute a survey of a technical area in industrial 
engineering, operations research, or management science, or may involve 
the solution of an actual or hypothetical technical problem. 

Prerequisite: Fifteen credit hours of course- 
work or by permission of the in- 
structor. 

Department of Mathematics 

M610 Computational Mathematics 

Review of algebra. Topics from calculus, including differentiation and 
integration methods, infinite series, and Taylor series. Linear algebra, sys- 
tems of linear equations, and matrix methods. 

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of calculus. 

M620 Numerical Analysis 

Algorithms for obtaining numerical solutions on computers; topics in- 
clude: solution of nonlinear equations by iterative methods, matrix inver- 
sion, evaluation of determinants, and solution of systems of linear equations 
by direct and iterative methods, numerical integration, differentiation, and 
solution of differential equations by finite difference methods. 

Prerequisites: M610 or 9 semester hours of cal- 
culus and programming ability 
in FORTRAN 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

ME615 Adaptive Control Processes 

Review of dynamics and of control, electrical, and mechanical analogies. 
Optimization and computerization of the control process. 

Prerequisites: Advanced calculus, differential 
equations and dynamics. 

46 



ME620 Mathematical Models of Mechanical Systems 

Formulation of physical problems in mathematical terms and solution 
of the resulting differential equations. Applications in fluid mechanics, 
vibrations, heat transfer, diffusion, and electricity. Electrical, mechanical, 
and thermal analogies are analyzed. 

Prerequisites: Advanced calculus, and differen- 
tial equations. 



Department of Psychology 

P619 Organizational Behavior 

An analysis of various theories of business and managerial behavior em- 
phasizing the business organization and its internal processes. Psycholog- 
ical factors in business and industry, including motivation, incentives, and 
conflict. A study of research findings relevant to an understanding and 
prediction of human behavior in organization. 

P631 Social Psychology 

Current problems in Social Psychology. Attitude scale construction, 
attitude change, language as a social phenomena, patterns of culture, social 
class, groups, person perception, and conformity. 

P632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 

An exploration of the emerging area of Group Dynamics. The structure 
of groups, their development, process interaction analysis, formal and in- 
formal groups, group psychotherapy and sensitivity training. 

P633 Problems of Drug Abuse 

Discussion of selected issues and current problems in drug abuse. 

P634 Personality Assessment 

A critical survey of the theories and issues of Personality Assessment. 
Among topics to be discussed are intelligence, achievement and ability 
assessment. Personality tests and ethical questions associated with psycho- 
logical testing. 

P636 Abnormal Psychology 

Major personality theories and their implications. 

P670 Psychology of Personality 

An examination of the psychological and organic factors involved in 
personality training. 

47 



Department of Public Administration 

PA600 Principles of Public Administration 

The development, organization, functions, and problems of national, 
state, and local administration. 

PA602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 

The relationship between public administration and the formulation of 
public policies is studied. The implementation of public policies by ad- 
ministrators based on the politics of the administrator is examined in 
terms of interaction between various group representatives, i.e. the legis- 
lators, the politician, the pressure group leaders. 

Prerequisite : PA 600 

PA603 Resource Administration 

Growth of the concept of conserving and developing natural resources 
and its translation into public policy. Organization of the interrelationships 
among the principal resources administration agencies; the coordination 
of resources program, national, state, and local. 

PA604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change 

Interaction between the community as a social organization and educa- 
tion, police, and welfare institutions within it; special attention to con- 
ceptual frameworks and current research or action programs that impact 
particularly on minority groups. 

PA605 The Communication Process 

Major emphasis on the role of communication in a democracy and the 
effects of communication content. Brief treatment of content analysis tech- 
niques, person-to-person communication, and barriers to the flow of com- 
munication. 

PA620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining in the Public 
Sector 

Study of the civil service systems of the United States and the state 
governments, including a systematic review of the methods of recruitment, 
promotion, discipline, control, and removal. 

Explores the effects on work relationships as a result of collective bar- 
gaining statutes which have been adopted by legislatures. Emphasis is 
placed on Connecticut's collective bargaining statutes. 

PA625 Administrative Behavior 

The problems faced by an administrator in dealing with interpersonal 
relationships and human processes. Analysis of individual and group be- 
havior in various governmental and business settings to determine the ad- 
ministrative action for the promotion of desired work performance. Em- 
phasis given to the public sector. 

Participation in actual problem situation discussions and case studies. 

48 



PA630 Governmental Accounting 

A comprehensive survey of the essential principles of governmental ac- 
counting, budgeting, cost accounting, and financial reporting. The various 
operating funds, bonded debt, fixed assets, investments, classification of 
revenue and expenditures, general property taxes, and interfund relation- 
ships. 

PA632 Public Finance and Budgeting 

State and local expenditure patterns, state and local revenue sources, in- 
come taxation at the state and local level, excise taxation, sales taxation, 
taxation of capital, and the property tax. Emphasis on fiscal and economic 
aspects of federalism and federal-state fiscal coordination. The role of the 
budget in the determination of policy, in administrative integration, in 
control of government operations. 

PA633 Financial Administration 

Seminar on selected aspects of public financial administration including 
revenues, accounting, expenditures, public debt, special funds, and audit- 
ing. 

Prerequisite: PA 630 

PA634 Problems of Municipal Management 

Study of selected problems of city management, with emphasis on "house- 
keeping" and line operations. 

Prerequisite: PA 630 

PA635 Statistics for Public Administrators 

Provides a basic theoretical treatment of the nature of statistical analysis 
and its role in economic research design and procedure. 

PA640 Purchasing 

Current innovative techniques used in purchasing. Emphasis on ware- 
housing, storage, inventory control, and cooperative purchasing plans. 

PA647 Zoning and Land Subdivision Regulation 

Ordinance structure and planning theory as expressed in texts of or- 
dinances. Selected court cases. 



PA650 Administrative Law 

A searching for principles and criteria against which public interest can 
be balanced with private right in the changing patterns of government, with 
particular reference to the American System. 

Prerequisite: PA 600 

49 



PA651 Municipal Corporation 

Nature of the municipal corporation embracing creation and dissolution 
legislative power over such corporations, extent of municipal powers, police 
power, zoning, power to contract, rights and remedies of creditors, power 
to issue evidence of indebtedness. 

Prerequisite: PA 650 

PA660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

Explores the concept of physical planning within the urban develop- 
ment framework. The function of planning in its relationship to the environ- 
ment. Comprehensive planning with its many ramifications involving the 
various sections of our society. Methods for analyzing problems as well 
as design methods for problem solving. 

Prerequisite: PA 602 

PA661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 

Analysis of the problems of government and administration arising from 
the population patterns and physical and social structures of contemporary 
metropolitan communities. 

Prerequisite: PA 660 

PA662 Environmental Design 

The basic problems necessary to an assessment of the quality levels of 
the environment based on geographic areas. Factors responsible for com- 
munity development. 

Prerequisite: PA 660 

PA690 Project in Public Administration 

Independent study for advanced graduate students on selected problems 
in public administration. May be repeated for credit. 

Prerequisite: 21 graduate hours. 

PA691 Research Methods in Public Administration 

Designed to familiarize the administrator with the tools and potentialities 
of social research and to assist him in the presentation, interpretation, and 
application of research data. 

Prerequisite: PA 600 

PA692 Seminar in Public Opinion 

Problems of identification and analysis of public opinion and its impact 
upon the political process. Problems of data collection and questionnaire 
construction; categorization of qualitative data, elements of scaling, logic 
of multivariate analysis; role of comparative and cross-national surveys of 
public opinion. 

Prerequisite: PA 602 

50 



PA693 Public Administration Internship 

A supervised work experience in a cooperating public service agency 
related to government. Students must be available for at least 1 day per 
week. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 



Department of Political Science 

PS601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the relation of the judicial process and constitutional law to 
the political process in the United States. Judicial review, federalism, and 
separation and delegation of powers. 

PS602 Civil Liberties and Rights 

An analysis of civil liberties, civil rights, due process, and equal protec- 
tion of the law. An examination of the role of the public official in the 
protection, denial, or abridgement of the constitutional and legal rights 
of individuals. 



PS604 Political Parties 

A historical and functional analysis of the operation of the American 
Party system with special reference to interest groups, public opinion, 
electoral behavior, and proposals for reorganization of the existing party 
system. 

PS605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition, and classification of criminal law. Offenses 
against the person habitation, and occupancy. Offenses against property 
and other offenses. Special defenses. Emphasis on the Connecticut penal 
code. 



PS608 The Legislative Process 

The role of the legislature in modern American Government at the 
State and National level, theories of representation, the relationship of 
electors and apportionment to the law making process, the veto power, 
the committee system, seniority rules, and Constitutional limitations, as 
well as the interest group phenomenon. 

PS616 Urban Government and Politics 

An examination of the historical structures and processes of urban 
metropolitan government with special emphasis on conflict and cooperative 
factors. 

51 



Department of Sociology 

SO6C0 Minority Group Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of minority groups in the United States with 
special reference to ethnic, religious, and racial factors that influence in- 
teraction. 

SO605 Culture and Personality 

The effect of different cultures upon personality development. Cultural 
mores and norms as vehicles of control. 

50607 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

A general introduction to the field of delinquency and crime, including 
all aspects of the social and personal matrix out of which these forms of 
social destructiveness arise. 

50608 Criminology 

A survey of the available data and theories relating to the scope and 
nature of the crime problem, characteristics of the offenders, and the fac- 
tors that are correlated with crime. Emphasis on social institutions that play 
significant roles in the increase or decrease of criminal activity as it exists 
in the United States and other cultures. Environmental and personality 
factors that influence criminal behavior. 

50609 Comparative Social Organization 

A comparative analysis of social and political organizations in cultures 
of varying complexity. 

50610 Urban Sociology 

The problem of urban growth and development. Residential patterns to- 
gether with the physical development of cities and the redevelopment 
plans. An examination of the people and their relationships to the en- 
vironment. 

Prerequisite: PA 604 

S0631 Population Problems and Human Ecology 

A sociological approach to social demography with attention on popula- 
tion growth, patterns of distribution of population, and the population 
changes and trends. 

S0635 Sociology of Law 

A study of the social origins and consequences of law and legal processes. 
Emphasis on problems of legal change and the structure and functioning 
of legal sanctions. Emphasis on law and legal sanction in other societies, 
including primitive societies. Major focus on American society. 

52 



FACULTY— 1973-1974 

Baum, Stefan H., Lecturer, Business Administration 

M.E., Technical Institute Berlin-Charlottenburg; Ph.D. Friedrich Wil- 

helm University, Berlin 
Beckert, John F., Lecturer, Business Administration 

A.B., Dartmouth College; M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Berger, Mark, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Columbia University; LL.B., Yale University 
Bragaw, Louis K., Lecturer, Economics 

B.S., U. S. Coast Guard Academy; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; M.B.A., Northeastern University; D.B.A., George Wash- 
ington University 
Ciarlone, Richard, Lecturer, Economics 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., University of Maryland 
Cleaver, David S., Assistant Professor, Economics 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D. University of Illinois 
Courtney, Dennis, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Dinegar, Caroline, Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Eikaas, Faith H., Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Flynn, Charles L., Lecturer, Public Administration 

Ph.B., Providence College; J.D., Georgetown University 
George, Edward T., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D. Engr., Yale University 
Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida Institute 

of Technology 
Headley, Oliver, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Economics 

A.B., Colgate University; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., New York 

University 

Hopmayer, Norman, Professor, Business Administration 

B.S., M.S., Northwestern University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York Univer- 
sity 

Hvman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S. City College of New York; Ph.D. 
University of Cincinnati 

Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Ladd, Richard A., Adjunct Professor, Economics 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

53 



Liu, David H. F., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.Sc., Jadarpur University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Loughlin, James, Lecturer, Economics 

B.S., Fordham University; M.A., Ph.D., Clark University 
Mandour, Ahmed R., Assistant Professor, Business Administration 

B.A., American University at Cairo; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 

Oklahoma 
Mann, Richard A., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin 
Meier, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Montague, Richard, Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., New Haven College; M.S., Columbia University 
Murillo, Robert B., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., M.A., University of New Mexico 
Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Business Administration 

L.L.B., University of Helsinki; L.L.M., Columbia University; D.J.S., 

New York Law School 
O'Keefe, Daniel C, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon Univer- 
sity 
Oulundsen, Terrance O., Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.A., Trinity College; M.B.A., Columbia Business School; M.S., Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute 
Parker, Joseph A., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 
Parker, L. Craig, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State Univer- 
sity of New York at Buffalo 
Petersen, Willard S., Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., Yale University; M.B.A., Tuck School of Business Administration, 

Dartmouth College 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Rajeswaran, Punnusany, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.Sc, University of Ceylon; M.Crim., University of California at Berke- 
ley; A.R.I.C.-FAIC 

Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Business Administration 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 
C.P.A. (Connecticut) 

Rezendes, Dennis, Lecturer, Public Administration 

B.A., University of Maine; M.A., The Wharton School, University of 
Pennsylvania 

Robin, Gerald P., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

54 



Saleeby, Buddy B., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union, M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Sawhney, Shiv L., Assistant Professor, Business Administration 

B.A., L.L.B., University of Delhi, M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Scherzer, Saul M., Lecturer, Public Administration 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.B.A., City University of New 
York; Ph.D., New York University 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Silbert, Jonathan E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Dartmouth College; J.D., Harvard Law School 

Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Business Administration 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

Stanley, Richard M., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.S, The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity 

Teluk, John J., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., New Haven Col- 
lege; M.A., Free University, Munich 

Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Tscholl, Ekkehard J. H., Associate Professor, Physics 

Diplomingenieu, Technische Hochschule Wien, Austria; Dr. Techn., 
Technische Hoogeschool Eindhoven, The Netherlands 

Wagge, Norman, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.B.A., City College of New York; C.P.C.U., American College of 
Property & Casualty Underwriters 

Williams, Jeffrey L., Assistant Professor, Accounting & Finance 

A.A., Dean Junior College; B.S. New Haven College; M.B.A. Univer- 
sity of Bridgeport 

Woods, Jimmie D., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., U. S. Coast Guard Academy; M.S. Trinity College; Ph.D., University 
of Connecticut 

Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 

York, Michael W., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land 

Zottolla, Armand, Lecturer, Economics 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



55